Mentoring initiative uses peer power to lift reading standards.

Richmond School

Thursday, 22nd December 2016

Mentoring initiative uses peer power to lift reading standards.

STUDENTS have opened a new chapter with an innovative reading scheme.

STUDENTS have opened a new chapter with an innovative scheme to encouraging reading.

Year 7 children at Richmond School and Sixth Form College have buddied up with sixth formers in a mentoring initiative that uses peer power to lift reading standards.

Run by Yorkshire charity Reading Matters, the project trains the sixth formers how to work with younger children on their reading and encourage a love of books.

Proven to help Year 7s with their reading, it also provides the opportunity for sixth formers to develop mentoring skills and gain a Level 2 qualification, which improves their personal statements for university and employment potential.

Lead learning manager for key stage 3 James Coldwell said: “This is the third year we have adopted the Reading Matters model and it has proved time and again to be a very effective.

“Peer power is so valuable and is recognised as the most effective intervention, particularly at KS3. It’s an absolute win win because the younger and older students all benefit.”

Lauren McGregor, 16, of Catterick Garrison, said: “Helping younger students has really helped us learn new skills, which has been very rewarding.”

Ross Kelly, 16, of Arkengarthdale, added: “It has been inspiring and has made us look at what we would like to do in the future with our lives.”

Reading Matters training manager Rachel Owens had high praise for the students. She said: “They have been a delightful group to work with; they have worked together very well and will make amazing reading leaders.

“My son went through the scheme on the receiving end. Someone helped him with his reading and he came on leaps and bounds, so when I got the chance to work for Reading Matters I jumped at the chance.”